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Monetary and Fiscal Policies in a Heterogeneous-Agent Economy


  • Hongfei Sun

    () (Queen's University)


I study the effects of long-run inflation and income taxation in an economy where households face uninsurable idiosyncratic risks. I construct a tractable competitive search framework that generates dispersion of prices, income and wealth. I analytically characterize the stationary equilibrium and the policy effects on individual choices. Quantitative analysis finds that monetary and fiscal policies have distinctive effects on macro aggregates, such as output, savings, wealth dispersion, income and consumption inequalities. There can be a hump-shape relationship between welfare and the respective policies. Overall, welfare can be maximized by a deviation from the Friedman rule, paired with distortionary income taxation.

Suggested Citation

  • Hongfei Sun, 2011. "Monetary and Fiscal Policies in a Heterogeneous-Agent Economy," Working Papers 1262, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:qed:wpaper:1262

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    Cited by:

    1. Guillaume Rocheteau & Pierre-Olivier Weill & Tsz-Nga Wong, 2015. "A Tractable Model of Monetary Exchange with Ex-post Heterogeneity," NBER Working Papers 21179, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Guerrieri, Veronica & Julien, Benoit & Kircher, Philipp & Wright, Randall, 2017. "Directed Search: A Guided Tour," CEPR Discussion Papers 12315, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Guillaume Rocheteau & Pierre-Olivier Weill & Tsz-Nga Wong, 2015. "Working through the Distribution: Money in the Short and Long Run," NBER Working Papers 21779, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item


    competitive search; distributional effect; monetary and fiscal policies;

    JEL classification:

    • E0 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General
    • E4 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates
    • E5 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit
    • E6 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook
    • H2 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue
    • H3 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents

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