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A Physics Solution to the Hardest Problem in Social Science: Physics Foundation of Permanent World Peace

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  • Wayne, James J.

Abstract

One problem is standing out above all others in social science: how should humanity govern itself? The problem is so important that all wars of humanity in the past, present, and future, are directly related to this problem. Despite the fact that this problem has attracted interests of some greatest thinkers for thousands of years: Confucius, Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Locke, Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Kant, Marx, Einstein, Hayek, and many others, yet the problem remains unsolved. The latest thinking on this humanity governing problem by mainstream social scientists is represented by views of Friedrich Hayek. In his writings, Hayek repeatedly warned that we must shed the illusion that we can deliberately create the future of mankind. This paper disagrees with Hayek and proves for the first time that this problem is solvable scientifically applying recently-created physics laws of social science, if the problem is formulated in a correct way: what kind of governing political structure of humanity is most stable? Most-stable structure problems appear routinely in the theoretical and experimental condensed matter physics. We show that the humanity governing problem is equivalent to find an equilibrium political structure of a human society, which is a many-body physics problem 100% solvable using the maximum entropy approach widely-used in the condensed matter physics. This paper establishes the framework and methodology of quantum politics and replaces traditional political philosophy with quantum physics as the solid foundation of political science, and analyzes the equilibrium political structure of a human society. The main results are quite surprising: (1) Quantum physics does provide a firm scientific foundation for social science. For the first time, political science, economics, and other social science become branches of quantum physics just like optics and chemistry. (2) Quantum physics says that we can create free, fair, just, peaceful, and prosperous human societies. We prove that there is certainly no better alternative than the equilibrium political structure, which is defined by a set of 16 democratic principles. (3) The existing democratic governments in the world can be improved in significant ways. For example, there are many fundamental design flaws in the US constitution. American civil wars, slavery, epidemic gun violence, and run away government debts are some direct results of design flaws of the US constitution. (4) Quantum physics clearly says that there is a global political equilibrium state, which corresponds to the permanent world peace. This paper provides a theoretically-sound and practical solution to eliminate the nuclear, biological, chemical, robotic, and other forms of weapons of massive destruction. In the long run, humanity can grow up and will put an end to deaths, miseries, and economic destruction caused by wars, which have been plagued us since the dawn of humanity.

Suggested Citation

  • Wayne, James J., 2014. "A Physics Solution to the Hardest Problem in Social Science: Physics Foundation of Permanent World Peace," MPRA Paper 59634, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:59634
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/59634/1/MPRA_paper_59634.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Wayne, James J., 2013. "Physics Laws of Social Science," MPRA Paper 47811, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Wayne, James J., 2013. "Fundamental Equation of Economics," MPRA Paper 59574, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Scott Gates & Torbjørn L. Knutsen & Jonathon W. Moses, 1996. "Democracy and Peace: A More Skeptical View," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 33(1), pages 1-10, February.
    4. Wayne, James J., 2014. "A Scientific Macroeconomic Model Derived from Fundamental Equation of Economics," MPRA Paper 59591, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Kenneth J. Arrow, 1950. "A Difficulty in the Concept of Social Welfare," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 58, pages 328-328.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Wayne, James J., 2014. "Generalized Second Law of Thermodynamics and Its Applications in Social Science," MPRA Paper 59734, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Wayne, James J., 2014. "Psychohistory Paradox and Introduction to Quantum Social Science," MPRA Paper 59858, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Wayne, James J., 2014. "Tragedy of Commonly-Shared Debts," MPRA Paper 59712, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Wayne, James J., 2014. "Commonly Shared Foundation of Mathematics, Information Science, Natural Science, Social Science, and Theology," MPRA Paper 59834, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Wayne, James J., 2014. "Fundamental Design Flaws of United States Constitution," MPRA Paper 59664, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Wayne, James J., 2014. "Arrow of time Phenomena in Social Science and Sixteen Global Mega Trends of Human Society," MPRA Paper 59685, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Wayne, James J., 2014. "Human Behavior Paradox and a Social Science Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics," MPRA Paper 59718, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    quantum politics; physics laws of social science; permanent world peace; democracy theory; free will; fundamental equation of economics; democratic principles; hydrodynamics modes; equilibrium;

    JEL classification:

    • A12 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Relation of Economics to Other Disciplines
    • D7 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making
    • D71 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Social Choice; Clubs; Committees; Associations
    • D73 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Bureaucracy; Administrative Processes in Public Organizations; Corruption
    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions
    • D8 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty
    • D86 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Economics of Contract Law

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