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Dual citizenship granted to hungarian ethnics. context and arguments


  • Brie, Mircea
  • Polgar, Istvan


Citizenship represents the permanent legal and political relationship that exists between the state and the individual. Citizenship is often defined in terms of legislation and accompanying political debates, far from the realities experienced by citizens. Due to the lack of uniformity between laws of different countries regarding the criteria for granting citizenship, an individual can be found in a position to have more than one citizenship or in a position where his/her right to citizenship is denied. We are facing a citizenship conflict that bears the concept of multi-nationality or even of statelessness.

Suggested Citation

  • Brie, Mircea & Polgar, Istvan, 2011. "Dual citizenship granted to hungarian ethnics. context and arguments," MPRA Paper 44100, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2011.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:44100

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ignacio Sánchez-Cuenca, 2000. "The Political Basis of Support for European Integration," European Union Politics, , vol. 1(2), pages 147-171, June.
    2. Rosa Sanchez Salgado, 2008. "European Money at Work: Contracting a European Identity?," Les Cahiers européens de Sciences Po 4, Centre d'études européennes (CEE) at Sciences Po, Paris.
    3. Kenneth Shepsle & Barry Weingast, 1981. "Structure-induced equilibrium and legislative choice," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 503-519, January.
    4. North,Douglass C. & Wallis,John Joseph & Weingast,Barry R., 2013. "Violence and Social Orders," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9781107646995, March.
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    More about this item


    citizenship; society; Romania; Hungary; perception;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • K33 - Law and Economics - - Other Substantive Areas of Law - - - International Law
    • J8 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards
    • F5 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy


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