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International migration and new mobility trends


  • Abramuszkinova Pavlikova, Eva


World migration community covers 3 per cent of the world population, in Europe it is around 7 per cent and 4 per cent in the Czech Republic. Europe is an important target for migration stimulated by the work offer but also by wars and natural disasters. In Western Europe at the end of the 20th century there were 20 millions of foreign migrants and also probably 3–5 million illegal migrants. Recently, we have faced new trends in international mobility which are different from traditional migration flows. They include mobility of multinational firms employees, mobility of students, pensioners but also mobility of professionals. Specific area under study is foreign migration or mobility of scientists and researchers. There is another phenomena connected with the development of modern technologies which stimulates the mobility in virtual space. Virtual mobility is another form of mobility which is using virtual space for communication, study, work and other aspects of life. The aim of this paper is to introduce the main trends in international migration including the traditional ones but stressing the new types of international mobility. The focus will be on the current situation in the Czech Republic related to migration.

Suggested Citation

  • Abramuszkinova Pavlikova, Eva, 2010. "International migration and new mobility trends," MPRA Paper 30509, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:30509

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    More about this item


    migration; international mobility; high skilled professionals; brain drain; virtual mobility;

    JEL classification:

    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers
    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification


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