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Коррупция В Высшем Образовании Как Наследие Средневековых Университетов
[Corruption as a Legacy of the Medieval University]

Author

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  • Osipian, Ararat

Abstract

Looking back upon the centuries one would suspect that in earlier ages universities of medieval France and Italy were very different from the multiplicity of organizational and institutional forms of higher education institutions in modern times, and yet one would be surprised how much these old universitas and modern universities have in common. The increasing scale and scope of corruption in higher education in the former Soviet Bloc as well as numerous other countries urges a better understanding of the problem within the context of socio-economic transformations. Corruption in higher education is deeply rooted in the organizational structure of each higher education institution. This paper analyzes corrupt legacies in admission, teaching and learning, and graduation.

Suggested Citation

  • Osipian, Ararat, 2004. "Коррупция В Высшем Образовании Как Наследие Средневековых Университетов
    [Corruption as a Legacy of the Medieval University]
    ," MPRA Paper 13250, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:13250
    as

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/13250/1/MPRA_paper_13250.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Veronica Balzarotti & Michael Falkenheim & Andrew Powell, 2002. "On the Use of Portfolio Risk Models and Capital Requirements in Emerging Markets: The Case of Argentina," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 16(2), pages 197-212, August.
    2. Carmen M. Reinhart, 2002. "Default, Currency Crises, and Sovereign Credit Ratings," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 16(2), pages 151-170, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    corruption; medieval; university;

    JEL classification:

    • P36 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Consumer Economics; Health; Education and Training; Welfare, Income, Wealth, and Poverty
    • P37 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Legal
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions

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