IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Population Growth and Local Home Environment Externality in an Endogenous Growth Model with Two Engines of Growth


  • Shirou Kuwahara

    () (Graduate School of Systems and Information Engineering, University of Tsukuba)

  • Katsunori Yamada

    () (Graduate School of Economics, Osaka University)


This paper presents an endogenous growth model with population growth and an inter-generational spillover of human capital: we consider the ``local home environment externality conceptualized by Galor and Tsiddon (1997a). The model will generate a negative relationship between the population growth rate and the per capita GDP growth rate, which is also present in the data. Furthermore, multiple equilibrium paths will result. As far as we know, this is the first paper that derives a multiplicity of steady growth paths in a model with two sources of growth and the Jones technology. The paper also casts a paradox that the GDP growth rate may be higher in the society without the externality than the one in the economy with externality.

Suggested Citation

  • Shirou Kuwahara & Katsunori Yamada, 2007. "Population Growth and Local Home Environment Externality in an Endogenous Growth Model with Two Engines of Growth," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 07-22, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
  • Handle: RePEc:osk:wpaper:0722

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Hansen, Lars Peter, 1982. "Large Sample Properties of Generalized Method of Moments Estimators," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(4), pages 1029-1054, July.
    2. Gerard A. Pfann & Franz C. Palm, 1993. "Asymmetric Adjustment Costs in Non-linear Labour Demand Models for the Netherlands and U.K. Manufacturing Sectors," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(2), pages 397-412.
    3. Jaramillo, Fidel & Schiantarelli, Fabio & Sembenelli, Alessandro, 1993. "Are Adjustment Costs for Labor Asymmetric? An Econometric Test on Panel Data for Italy," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 75(4), pages 640-648, November.
    4. Kenji Azetsu & Mototsugu Fukushige, 2009. "The estimation of asymmetric adjustment costs for the number of workers and working hours - empirical evidence from Japanese industry data," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(10), pages 995-998.
    5. Goux, Dominique & Maurin, Eric & Pauchet, Marianne, 2001. "Fixed-term contracts and the dynamics of labour demand," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(3), pages 533-552, March.
    6. Hildreth, Andrew K. G. & Ohtake, Fumio, 1998. "Labor Demand and the Structure of Adjustment Costs in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 131-150, June.
    7. Nickell, S.J., 1987. "Dynamic models of labour demand," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & R. Layard (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 9, pages 473-522 Elsevier.
    8. Ohtani, Kazuhiro & Kakimoto, Sumio & Abe, Kenzo, 1990. "A gradual switching regression model with a flexible transition path," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 43-48, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item


    population growth; multiple equilibria; R&D; Jones technology; the local home environment externality;

    JEL classification:

    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:osk:wpaper:0722. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Atsuko SUZUKI). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.