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Evidence of Environmental Migration: Housing values alone may not capture the full effects of local environmental disamenities

Author

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  • Trudy Ann Cameron

    () (Department of Economics, University of Oregon)

  • Ian McConnaha

    (Student, Department of Economics, University of Oregon)

Abstract

In hedonic property value models, economists typically assume that changing perceptions of environmental risk should be captured by changes in housing prices. However, for long-lived environmental problems, we find that many other features of neighborhoods seem to change as well, because households relocate in response to changes in perceived environmental quality. We consider spatial patterns in census variables over three decades in the vicinity of four Superfund sites. We find many examples of moving and staying behavior, inferred from changes in the relative concentrations of a wide range of socio-demographic groups in census tracts near the site versus farther away.

Suggested Citation

  • Trudy Ann Cameron & Ian McConnaha, 2005. "Evidence of Environmental Migration: Housing values alone may not capture the full effects of local environmental disamenities," University of Oregon Economics Department Working Papers 2005-7, University of Oregon Economics Department, revised 01 Jan 2005.
  • Handle: RePEc:ore:uoecwp:2005-7
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    File URL: http://economics.uoregon.edu/papers/UO-2005-7_Cameron_Mitigation.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    hedonic property values; environmental disamenities;

    JEL classification:

    • Q53 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Air Pollution; Water Pollution; Noise; Hazardous Waste; Solid Waste; Recycling
    • R31 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - Housing Supply and Markets
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes

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