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Special and Differential Treatment Under the GATS


  • OECD


This report sets out the particular approach to special and differential treatment (SDT) in the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS). In particular, the report explores how the degree of flexibility afforded to all Members under the GATS shapes its approach to SDT. Further, the report analyses the current proposals for improving SDT provisions in the context of the GATS. Finally, some initial empirical evidence on the use and effectiveness of SDT provisions in the GATS is presented, both in terms of market access in sectors of export interest to developing countries and services-related technical assistance.

Suggested Citation

  • Oecd, 2006. "Special and Differential Treatment Under the GATS," OECD Trade Policy Papers 26, OECD Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:traaab:26-en

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Barabas, György & Kitlinski, Tobias & Schmidt, Christoph M. & Schmidt, Torsten & Siemers, Lars-H. & Brilon, Werner, 2010. "Verkehrsinfrastrukturinvestitionen: Wachstumsaspekte im Rahmen einer gestaltenden Finanzpolitik. Endbericht - Januar 2010. Forschungsprojekt im Auftrag des Bundesministeriums der Finanzen. Projektnumm," RWI Projektberichte, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, number 72601.
    2. Martin Bijsterbosch & Marcin Kolasa, 2010. "FDI and productivity convergence in Central and Eastern Europe: an industry-level investigation," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 145(4), pages 689-712, January.
    3. Jaunky, Vishal Chandr, 2011. "The CO2 emissions-income nexus: Evidence from rich countries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 1228-1240, March.

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    developing countries; services; special and differential treatment; trade policy; WTO;

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