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The OECD Regulatory Reform Review of Indonesia: Market Openness


  • Molly Lesher



This paper focuses on the market openness aspects of regulatory reform in Indonesia to devise recommendations for improving the country’s regulatory processes. These recommendations involve institutionalising independent and objective evaluations of policies from an economy-wide perspective, as well as instituting a process by which broad public consultations are systematically required. Moreover, the findings in this paper suggest that the Indonesian economy would benefit from streamlining the licensing regime. The paper also identifies a need to ensure that new laws and regulations benefit Indonesia as a whole. Finally, the paper advocates for better co-ordination between the central government and the periphery. The implementation of these recommendations will help Indonesia achieve its goal of becoming one of the world’s ten major economies by 2025.

Suggested Citation

  • Molly Lesher, 2012. "The OECD Regulatory Reform Review of Indonesia: Market Openness," OECD Trade Policy Papers 138, OECD Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:traaab:138-en

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    APEC; ASEAN; DNI; Indonesia; INSW; INTR; investment; Investment Negative List; market openness; Regional Autonomy; Regulatory Process; regulatory reform; trade;

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