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Subsidiarity: Implications for New Zealand

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Abstract

Subsidiarity requires taking decisions at the level of government best placed to do so, but does not say what that level is. Rather, it gives a broad framework within which to have the debate. Implementing subsidiarity means (1) allocating roles appropriately between levels of government, (2) co-ordinating implementation of decisions, and (3) managing accountability and participation. Subsidiarity does not, however, tell us how to achieve these goals. It is therefore more about how a decision is made than about what the specific decision is. Europe, the United States and Australia have adopted varying solutions to these issues. New Zealand’s ability to influence the trans-Tasman outcome is likely to be limited. The main implications for New Zealand are in designing trans-Tasman institutions and allocating responsibilities between central and local government.

Suggested Citation

  • Kevin Guerin, 2002. "Subsidiarity: Implications for New Zealand," Treasury Working Paper Series 02/03, New Zealand Treasury.
  • Handle: RePEc:nzt:nztwps:02/03
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    File URL: http://www.treasury.govt.nz/publications/research-policy/wp/2002/02-03/twp02-03.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Natalie Brady, 2002. "Striking a Balance: Centralised and Decentralised Decisions in Government," Treasury Working Paper Series 02/15, New Zealand Treasury.
    2. Basil Sharp, 2002. "Institutions and Decision Making for Sustainable Development," Treasury Working Paper Series 02/20, New Zealand Treasury.
    3. Kevin Guerin, 2002. "Protection against Government Takings: Compensation for Regulation?," Treasury Working Paper Series 02/18, New Zealand Treasury.
    4. James E. Rowe, 2010. "Restructuring economic development in the Auckland region," Regional Science Policy & Practice, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 2(2), pages 121-134, November.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Subsidiarity; Harmonisation;

    JEL classification:

    • H11 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government - - - Structure and Scope of Government
    • H77 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - Intergovernmental Relations; Federalism

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