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Affective Polarization Did Not Increase During the Coronavirus Pandemic

Author

Listed:
  • Levi Boxell
  • Jacob Conway
  • James N. Druckman
  • Matthew Gentzkow

Abstract

We document trends in affective polarization during the coronavirus pandemic. In our main measure, affective polarization is relatively flat between July 2019 and February 2020, then falls significantly around the onset of the pandemic. Two other data sources show no evidence of an increase in polarization around the onset of the pandemic. Finally, we show in an experiment that priming respondents to think about the coronavirus pandemic significantly reduces affective polarization.

Suggested Citation

  • Levi Boxell & Jacob Conway & James N. Druckman & Matthew Gentzkow, 2020. "Affective Polarization Did Not Increase During the Coronavirus Pandemic," NBER Working Papers 28036, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:28036
    Note: POL
    as

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    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w28036.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Faia, Ester & Fuster, Andreas & Pezone, Vincenzo & Zafar, Basit, 2021. "Biases in information selection and processing: Survey evidence from the pandemic," SAFE Working Paper Series 307, Leibniz Institute for Financial Research SAFE.
    2. Winnie W. S. Mak & Sin Man Ng & Emily W. S. Tsoi & Ben C. L. Yu, 2022. "Interconnectedness Is Associated with a Greater Sense of Civic Duty and Collective Action Participation through Transcendental Awareness and Compassion during COVID-19," IJERPH, MDPI, vol. 19(12), pages 1-11, June.
    3. Richard A. Benton & J. Adam Cobb & Timothy Werner, 2022. "Firm partisan positioning, polarization, and risk communication: Examining voluntary disclosures on COVIDÔÇÉ19," Strategic Management Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(4), pages 697-723, April.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • P16 - Economic Systems - - Capitalist Systems - - - Political Economy of Capitalism

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