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The propensity to exports and the membership in the Economic and Monetary Union of Central and Eastern European Countries: the micro-econometric firm level analysis


  • Andrzej Cieślik

    (Faculty of Economic Sciences University of Warsaw)

  • Jan Jakub Michałek

    (Faculty of Economic Sciences University of Warsaw)


There are many studies aiming at estimation of aggregate trade effects of the euro adoption by the old EU countries, which are based on the gravity model. In contrast to the existing literature we investigate whether the adoption of the common currency increases the export activity of individual firms. In particular, we refer to the new strand in the trade theory, based on the Melitz (2003) model, in which propensity to export depends on productivity and costs of exporting. There are many empirical studies, based on firm level data, showing the relevance of the Melitz (2003) model. Most of those studies demonstrate that export performance positively depends on firms’ characteristics, but they do not take into account the impact of the common currency on the cost of exporting. There are only few studies analyzing implications of euro adoption for firms’ exports of “old EU” members. In our empirical paper we use the firm level data basis set up by the EBRD and the World Bank. Using the probit model we analyze whether the accession of Slovenia and Slovakia to the Eurozone did increase the firms’ propensity to export in those countries.

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  • Andrzej Cieślik & Jan Jakub Michałek, 2014. "The propensity to exports and the membership in the Economic and Monetary Union of Central and Eastern European Countries: the micro-econometric firm level analysis," NBP Working Papers 173, Narodowy Bank Polski, Economic Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbp:nbpmis:173

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Thomas I. Palley, 2009. "Imports and the income-expenditure model: implications for fiscal policy and recession fighting," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(2), pages 311-322, December.
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    JEL classification:

    • F12 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Models of Trade with Imperfect Competition and Scale Economies; Fragmentation
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • F33 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Monetary Arrangements and Institutions

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