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Indeterminacy and Market Instability


  • Nicholas C.S. Sim

    (Department of Economics, Boston College, USA)

  • Kong-Weng Ho

    (Division of Economics,School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore)


This note shows that indeterminacy arising from an economy exhibiting production with social constant returns to scale may be related to the instability of the consumption goods market equilibrium. Furthermore, trade does not contribute to indeterminacy; indeterminacy arises becasue each country’s equilibrium path is already indeterminate before trade.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicholas C.S. Sim & Kong-Weng Ho, 2007. "Indeterminacy and Market Instability," Economic Growth Centre Working Paper Series 0705, Nanyang Technological University, School of Social Sciences, Economic Growth Centre.
  • Handle: RePEc:nan:wpaper:0705

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Torsten Persson & Guido Tabellini, 2004. "Constitutions and Economic Policy," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 18(1), pages 75-98, Winter.
    2. Ronald D. Lee, 1994. "Population Age Structure, Intergenerational Transfer, and Wealth: A New Approach, with Applications to the United States," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 29(4), pages 1027-1063.
    3. Jorge Martinez-Vazquez & Violeta Vulovic & Yongzheng Liu, 2011. "Direct versus Indirect Taxation: Trends, Theory, and Economic Significance," Chapters,in: The Elgar Guide to Tax Systems, chapter 2 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Dani Rodrik, 1998. "Why Do More Open Economies Have Bigger Governments?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(5), pages 997-1032, October.
    5. Li Wenli & Pierre -Daniel Sarte, 2004. "Progressive Taxation and Long-Run Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(5), pages 1705-1716, December.
    6. Atkinson, A. B. & Stiglitz, J. E., 1976. "The design of tax structure: Direct versus indirect taxation," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1-2), pages 55-75.
    7. Alesina, Alberto & Wacziarg, Romain, 1998. "Openness, country size and government," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(3), pages 305-321, September.
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    More about this item


    Indeterminacy; Market Instability;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • F00 - International Economics - - General - - - General
    • F11 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Neoclassical Models of Trade
    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies

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