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The Returns to University Schooling in Canada

Author

Listed:
  • Vaillancourt, F.
  • Henriques, I.

Abstract

This Paper Presents Evidence on the Monetary Returns, Gross an Net of Taxes, of University Schooling in Canada and on the Private and Social Costs of That Type of Schooling. These Returns Are Obtained by Computing the Future Earnings of Males From Quebec and Ontario Aged 18 in 1981 and Faced with the Choice of Either Attending University of Working. Our Results Show That University Schooling Has a Private Rate of Return of 9 to 16 % and a Public Rate of Return of 7 to 10 %.

Suggested Citation

  • Vaillancourt, F. & Henriques, I., 1986. "The Returns to University Schooling in Canada," Cahiers de recherche 8608, Universite de Montreal, Departement de sciences economiques.
  • Handle: RePEc:mtl:montde:8608
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Richard B. Freeman & Karen Needels, 1993. "Skill Differentials in Canada in an Era of Rising Labor Market Inequality," NBER Chapters,in: Small Differences That Matter: Labor Markets and Income Maintenance in Canada and the United States, pages 45-68 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Francois Vaillancourt & Josee Carpentier & Irene Henriques, 1987. "The Returns to University Schooling in Canada: A Rejoinder," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 13(3), pages 389-390, September.
    3. Lemelin, Clément & Prud’homme, Philippe, 1994. "Le taux de rendement de l’éducation et la conjoncture économique : Québec, 1981-87," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 70(1), pages 27-41, mars.
    4. David Leadbeater & Peter Suschnigg, 1997. "Training as the Principal Focus of Adjustment Policy: A Critical View from Northern Ontario," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 23(1), pages 1-22, March.
    5. Christos Constantatos & Edwin G. West, 1991. "Measuring Returns from Education: Some Neglected Factors," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 17(2), pages 127-138, June.

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