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Life expectancy and quality of life adjusted in years induced by good health care


  • Jan Worst

    (Maastricht School of Management, the Netherlands)


New technology, pharmaceutical research and therapy development between 2000 and 2005 have contributed to increase globally life expectancy with five years according to the WHO report 2008. Increased life expectancy of youth in developing countries will enhance economic activity in developing countries. Prosperity characteristics such as income, nutrition, education, access to medical services support reduction of mortality of young people. Currently globally an economic slowdown is apparent. So what are the health risks for youth in the context of globally sharing prosperity?

Suggested Citation

  • Jan Worst, 2012. "Life expectancy and quality of life adjusted in years induced by good health care," Working Papers 2012/23, Maastricht School of Management.
  • Handle: RePEc:msm:wpaper:2012/23

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Kemeny, Thomas, 2010. "Does Foreign Direct Investment Drive Technological Upgrading?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(11), pages 1543-1554, November.
    2. Lipsey, Richard G. & Carlaw, Kenneth I. & Bekar, Clifford T., 2005. "Economic Transformations: General Purpose Technologies and Long-Term Economic Growth," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199290895.
    3. Diego A. Comin & Martí Mestieri Ferrer, 2013. "If Technology Has Arrived Everywhere, Why has Income Diverged?," NBER Working Papers 19010, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Scott Shane, 2009. "Why encouraging more people to become entrepreneurs is bad public policy," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 33(2), pages 141-149, August.
    5. Szirmai, Adam, 2012. "Proximate, intermediate and ultimate causality: Theories and experiences of growth and development," MERIT Working Papers 032, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
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    technology; therapy; health risks; life expectancy; and prosperity;

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