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How can gender discrimination explain fertility behaviors and family-friendly policies ?

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Abstract

This paper focuses on the interaction between gender discrimination and household decisions. It develops a general equilibrium model with endogenous fertility, endogenous labor supply and endogenous size of government spending. Family policies are assumed to decrease the time that parents spend on their children. The model shows that gender discrimination may explain differences in household decisions between countries. The solution shows a U-shaped relationship between fertility and gender discrimination. An increase in the discrimination level implies a related decrease in fertility, women's participation in the labor force and in family-friendly policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Magali Recoules, 2008. "How can gender discrimination explain fertility behaviors and family-friendly policies ?," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne v08098, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
  • Handle: RePEc:mse:cesdoc:v08098
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    File URL: ftp://mse.univ-paris1.fr/pub/mse/CES2008/V08098.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender discrimination; fertility; labor supply; public policies.;

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • H31 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Household
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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