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The Forgotten Second Quartile: Parental Income and Youth Post-secondary Education Enrolment in Australia


  • Michael B. Coelli


The relationship between parental income and the post-secondary education enrolment of youth aged 18-19 in Australia is investigated. Firstly, Census data from 1991 to 2006 are employed using the sample of youth still residing with parents. HILDA data are then used to analyze all youth over the 2004-2008 period, irrespective of living arrangements. The estimates highlight a strongly convex relationship for university enrolment, with enrolment rates essentially the same for the lowest two parental income quartiles, rising moderately for the third quartile then steeply for the top income quartile. This pattern is also observed if either parental occupation or postcode-based SES measures are employed rather than parental income. For other post-secondary enrolment, the relationship is an inverted U-shape. Parental education levels may have a large role in understanding these relationships.

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  • Michael B. Coelli, 2010. "The Forgotten Second Quartile: Parental Income and Youth Post-secondary Education Enrolment in Australia," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 1107, The University of Melbourne.
  • Handle: RePEc:mlb:wpaper:1107

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    Cited by:

    1. Michael Coelli & Domenico Tabasso, 2015. "Where Are the Returns to Lifelong Learning?," Research Papers by the Institute of Economics and Econometrics, Geneva School of Economics and Management, University of Geneva 15112, Institut d'Economie et Econométrie, Université de Genève.
    2. repec:erc:cypepr:v:11:y:2017:i:1:p:15-40 is not listed on IDEAS

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    university enrolment; parental income; equity;


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