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Impatto della cultura sui thinking style dei manager cinesi e australiani

Author

Listed:
  • Francesco SOFO

    ()

  • Cinzia COLAPINTO

    ()

Abstract

The thinking style profile is the basis of two important organizational processes (problem-solving and decision-making) and as such impacts significantly on company performance. The paper explores the thinking styles of Chinese and Australian managers and their reported preferences. Quantitative analysis of survey data from two thinking style inventories is conducted on a sample of 122 Chinese and 71 Australian public sector managers who completed Sofo’s (2002) Thinking Style Inventory (TSI) and Sternberg’s (1997) Forms of Thinking Styles (FTS). The TSI assesses preferences for different thinking styles: conditional, inquiry, exploring, independent and creative. The FTS assesses three thinking style preferences: legislative, executive and judiciary. The findings show that there were statistically significant differences between Chinese and Australian preferences for conditional, inquiry, exploring, independent, executive and judiciary styles of thinking, while there were no statistically significant differences for creative and legislative thinking style preferences. The implication of these differences is discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Francesco SOFO & Cinzia COLAPINTO, 2007. "Impatto della cultura sui thinking style dei manager cinesi e australiani," Departmental Working Papers 2007-46, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano.
  • Handle: RePEc:mil:wpdepa:2007-46
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    File URL: http://wp.demm.unimi.it/files/wp/2007/DEMM-2007_046wp.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Thinking Style; decision-making; cultural context; Chinese and Australian Managers;

    JEL classification:

    • D23 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Organizational Behavior; Transaction Costs; Property Rights
    • L20 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - General
    • P31 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Socialist Enterprises and Their Transitions

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