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The Evolution of Retirement as Systematic Ageism

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  • Lynn McDonald

Abstract

Questions that people ask, when they hear that mandatory retirement has been repealing include: will people be forced to toil longer to stay financially healthy? Will they change careers later in life to keep their interest in a subject or explore new interests? How will working longer affect their health? How will much older people affect the ambitions and working styles of younger colleagues? Will companies have to change their health and benefit plans to accommodate older people? This chapter discusses implications for both individuals and companies about hiring/retaining workers beyond the mandatory retirement age including differences in power relationships that place older workers who love and want to stay in their job in a compromised position. Issues related to international political economy will be addressed.

Suggested Citation

  • Lynn McDonald, 2012. "The Evolution of Retirement as Systematic Ageism," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 292, McMaster University.
  • Handle: RePEc:mcm:sedapp:292
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    File URL: http://socserv.mcmaster.ca/sedap/p/sedap292.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Michael Baker & Jonathan Gruber & Kevin Milligan, 2003. "The retirement incentive effects of Canada's Income Security programs," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 36(2), pages 261-290, May.
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    4. Chan, Sewin & Stevens, Ann Huff, 2004. "Do changes in pension incentives affect retirement? A longitudinal study of subjective retirement expectations," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(7-8), pages 1307-1333, July.
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    6. Tammy Schirle, 2008. "Why Have the Labor Force Participation Rates of Older Men Increased since the Mid-1990s?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26(4), pages 549-594, October.
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    12. Bender, Keith A. & Mavromaras, Kostas G. & Theodossiou, Ioannis & Wei, Zhang, 2014. "The Effect of Wealth and Earned Income on the Decision to Retire: A Dynamic Probit Examination of Retirement," IZA Discussion Papers 7927, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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    16. N. Lesca, 2010. "Introduction," Post-Print halshs-00640602, HAL.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Cultural economics; economic sociology; economic anthropology;

    JEL classification:

    • Z10 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - General

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