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Top Income Shares in Canada: Recent Trends and Policy Implications

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  • Michael R. Veall

Abstract

According to Canadian taxfiler data, over the last thirty years there has been a surge in the income shares of the top 1%, top 0.1% and top 0.01% of income recipients, even with longitudinal smoothing by individual using three- or five-year moving averages. Top shares fell in 2008 and 2009, but only by a fraction of the overall surge. Alberta, British Columbia and Ontario have much more pronounced surges than other provinces. Part of the Canadian surge is likely attributable to U.S. factors but a comprehensive explanation remains elusive. Even so, I draw implications for policies which might achieve some support from across the political spectrum, including the elimination of tax preferences that favour those with high incomes, the promotion of shareholder democracy and, to maintain Canada’s relatively high intergenerational mobility, continued wide accessibility to healthcare and education.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael R. Veall, 2012. "Top Income Shares in Canada: Recent Trends and Policy Implications," Department of Economics Working Papers 2012-11, McMaster University.
  • Handle: RePEc:mcm:deptwp:2012-11
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    income concentration; income polarization; Canadian personal income tax system; intergenerational mobility; corporate governance;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • H31 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Household
    • H24 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies

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