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Machen Kinder doch glücklich?

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  • Stephan Humpert

    () (Institute of Economics, Leuphana University of Lüneburg, Germany)

Abstract

In der ökonomischen Zufriedenheitsforschung wird ein negativer Effekt von Kindern auf die elterliche Zufriedenheit ermittelt. Dazu werden oftmals Probitmodelle geschätzt. In diesem Papier wird nun ein fixed effects Modell benutzt. Mittels Daten des Sozioökonomischen Panels (SOEP) werden Personen betrachtet, die im Zeitablauf zu Eltern werden. Es ergibt sich ein signifikant positiver Effekt von Kinder im Haushalt. Weiterhin werden Interaktionsterme gebildet, um Effekte individueller Arbeitslosigkeit einzufangen. Bei arbeitslosen Väter sinkt deutschlandweit die Zufriedenheit. Arbeitslose Mütter erleben in den alten Bundesländern einen positiven Zufriedenheitseffekt, in den neuen einen Negativen. Dies wird als Folge von regional unterschiedlichen weiblichen Erwerbsmustern in Deutschland interpretiert.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephan Humpert, 2010. "Machen Kinder doch glücklich?," Working Paper Series in Economics 167, University of Lüneburg, Institute of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:lue:wpaper:167
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    Cited by:

    1. Johannes Vatter, 2012. "Well-Being in Germany: What Explains the Regional Variation?," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 435, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    2. Stephan Humpert, 2010. "A Note on Happiness in Eastern Europe," European Research Studies Journal, European Research Studies Journal, vol. 0(3), pages 133-144.
    3. Vatter, Johannes, 2012. "Well-being in Germany: What explains the regional variation?," FZG Discussion Papers 50, University of Freiburg, Research Center for Generational Contracts (FZG).
    4. Stephan HUMPERT, 2015. "The kids are alright? A note on parental satisfaction in Germany," Theoretical and Applied Economics, Asociatia Generala a Economistilor din Romania - AGER, vol. 0(2(603), S), pages 285-292, Summer.
    5. repec:agr:journl:v:2(602):y:2015:i:2(602):p:285-292 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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