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Educational Content, Educational Institutions and Economic Development: Lessons from History

Author

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  • Cantoni, Davide
  • Yuchtman, Noam

Abstract

Individuals’ choices of educational content are often shaped by the political economy of government policies that determine the incentives to acquire various skills. We first present a model to show how differences in educational content emerge as an equilibrium outcome of private decisions and government policy choices. We then illustrate these dynamics in two historical circumstances. In medieval Europe, states and the Church found individuals trained in Roman law valuable, and eventually supported investments in this new form of human capital. This had positive effects on Europe’s commercial and institutional development. In late 19th-century China, elites were afraid of the introduction of Western science and engineering and continued to select civil servants - who enjoyed substantial rents—based on their knowledge of Confucian classics. As a result, China lacked skills useful in modern industry. Finally, we present a variety of other contemporary and historical applications of this theory.

Suggested Citation

  • Cantoni, Davide & Yuchtman, Noam, 2012. "Educational Content, Educational Institutions and Economic Development: Lessons from History," Discussion Papers in Economics 12691, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:lmu:muenec:12691
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    File URL: https://epub.ub.uni-muenchen.de/12691/1/Cantoni_Yuchtman_2011_Educational_Content_Educational_Institutions_and_Economic_Development_Lessons_from_History.pdf
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Paola Azar Dufrechou, 2018. "Higher education and economic development: can public funding restrain the returns from tertiary education?," Working Papers wpdea1802, Department of Applied Economics at Universitat Autonoma of Barcelona.
    2. Fuchs-Schündeln, Nicola & Masella, Paolo, 2013. "Long-Lasting Effects of Socialist Education," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79865, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Educational Content; Educational Institutions; Political Economy; Development;

    JEL classification:

    • N30 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O43 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Institutions and Growth

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