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Nurkse and the Role of Finance in Development Economics

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  • Jan Kregel

Abstract

Ragnar Nurkse was one the pioneers in development economics. This paper celebrates the hundredth anniversary of his birth with a critical retrospective of his overall contribution to the field, in particular his views on the importance of employment policy in mobilizing domestic resources and the difficulties surrounding the use of external resources to finance development. It also demonstrates the affinity between Nurkse's theory of mobilizing domestic resources and employer-of-last-resort proposals.

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  • Jan Kregel, 2007. "Nurkse and the Role of Finance in Development Economics," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_520, Levy Economics Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:lev:wrkpap:wp_520
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    Cited by:

    1. Aldo Caliari, 2012. "Why do Shared Societies make economic sense? Three theoretical approximations," Working Papers 2012/28, Maastricht School of Management.

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