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Understanding Victimization: The Case of Mozambique

Author

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  • Mikkel Barslund

    (Department of Economics, University of Copenhagen)

  • John Rand

    (Department of Economics, University of Copenhagen)

  • Finn Tarp

    (Department of Economics, University of Copenhagen)

  • Jacinto Chiconela

    (Ministry of Planning and Development (MPD), Mozambique)

Abstract

This paper analyzes how different economic characteristics at the individual, household and community level affect the risk of victimization, controlling for the impact of (non-economic) sociological factors. We use a nation wide household survey from Mozambique and show that the probability of being victimized is increasing in income, but at a diminishing rate. At the same time, poorer households are vulnerable. While less at risk of victimization, they tend to suffer relatively greater losses when such shocks occur. Economic development and reduction in victimization go hand in hand, and lower inequality and increased employment appear as effective means of combating crime.

Suggested Citation

  • Mikkel Barslund & John Rand & Finn Tarp & Jacinto Chiconela, 2005. "Understanding Victimization: The Case of Mozambique," Discussion Papers 05-17, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:kud:kuiedp:0517
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    File URL: http://www.econ.ku.dk/english/research/publications/wp/2005/0517.pdf/
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gary S. Becker, 1974. "Crime and Punishment: An Economic Approach," NBER Chapters,in: Essays in the Economics of Crime and Punishment, pages 1-54 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Gaviria, Alejandro & Pages, Carmen, 2002. "Patterns of crime victimization in Latin American cities," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 181-203, February.
    3. Fafchamps, Marcel & Minten, Bart, 2006. "Crime, Transitory Poverty, and Isolation: Evidence from Madagascar," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 54(3), pages 579-603, April.
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    5. Norman Loayza & Pablo Fajnzylber & Daniel Lederman, 2000. "Crime and Victimization: An Economic Perspective," ECONOMIA JOURNAL, THE LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN ECONOMIC ASSOCIATION - LACEA, vol. 0(Fall 2000), pages 219-302, August.
    6. Marcel Fafchamps & Christine Moser, 2003. "Crime, Isolation and Law Enforcement," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 12(4), pages 625-671, December.
    7. Fajnzylber, Pablo & Lederman, Daniel & Loayza, Norman, 2002. "What causes violent crime?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 46(7), pages 1323-1357, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Su, Qing, 2011. "Induced motor vehicle travel from improved fuel efficiency and road expansion," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(11), pages 7257-7264.
    2. Nicholas Rohde & Conchita D’Ambrosio & Kam Ki Tang & Prasada Rao, 2016. "Estimating the Mental Health Effects of Social Isolation," Applied Research in Quality of Life, Springer;International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies, vol. 11(3), pages 853-869, September.
    3. Shoji, Masahiro, 2017. "Religious Fractionalisation and Crimes in Disaster-Affected Communities: Survey Evidence from Bangladesh," MPRA Paper 78702, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Dufhues, Thomas & Buchenrieder, Gertrud & Quoc, Hoang Dinh & Munkung, Nuchanata, 2011. "Social capital and loan repayment performance in Southeast Asia," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(5), pages 679-691.
    5. Iamsiraroj, Sasi & Doucouliagos, Hristos, 2015. "Does growth attract FDI?," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 9, pages 1-35.
    6. Shoji, Masahiro, 2017. "Eliciting Guilt Sensitivity to Predict Real-World Behavior," MPRA Paper 81451, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Joseph DeSalvo & Qing Su, 2013. "An Empirical Analysis of Determinants of Multi-Dimensional Urban Sprawl," Working Papers 1813, University of South Florida, Department of Economics.
    8. Dufhues, Thomas & Buchenrieder, Gertrud & Munkung, Nuchanata, 2012. "Individual social capital and access to formal credit in Thailand," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 123401, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    9. Shoji, Masahiro, 2013. "Guilt aversion and peer effects in crime: experimental and empirical evidence from Bangladesh," MPRA Paper 44746, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Masahiro Shoji, 2014. "Channels of Peer Effects and Guilt Aversion in Crime: Experimental and Empirical Evidence from Bangladesh," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-923, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
    11. José Raimundo Carvalho & Sylvia Cristina Lavor, 2008. "Repeat criminal victimization and income inequality In Brazil," Anais do XXXVI Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 36th Brazilian Economics Meeting] 200807180945460, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pós-Graduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
    12. Yoshito Takasaki, 2011. "Fraud and Poverty: Exploring Ex Ante Victim Data," Tsukuba Economics Working Papers 2011-002, Economics, Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Tsukuba.
    13. repec:voj:journl:v:63:y:2016:i:2:p:231-258 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Su, Qing, 2011. "The effect of population density, road network density, and congestion on household gasoline consumption in U.S. urban areas," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 445-452, May.
    15. Joseph DeSalvo & Qing Su, 2013. "Determinants of Urban Sprawl: A Panel Data Approach," Working Papers 1613, University of South Florida, Department of Economics.
    16. Yoshito Takasaki, 2013. "Do natural disasters beget fraud victimization?: Unrealized coping through labor migration among the poor," Tsukuba Economics Working Papers 2013-002, Economics, Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Tsukuba.
    17. World Bank, 2011. "Violence in the City," World Bank Other Operational Studies 27454, The World Bank.
    18. José Kimou, 2012. "Economic conditions, enforcement, and criminal activities in the district of Abidjan," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 19(6), pages 913-941, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    victimization; crime; Africa; Mozambique; development; probit;

    JEL classification:

    • K40 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - General
    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa

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