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Current Situation and Challenges of Human Resources Management of Financial Institutions: Based on the 2017 Attitude Survey of Young and Mid-Level Staff of Japanese Financial Institutions


  • Nobuyoshi Yamori

    (Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration (RIEB), Kobe University, Japan)

  • Koji Yoneda

    (Faculty of Economics, Kumamoto Gakuen University, Japan)


In January 2017, we conducted an attitude survey of young and mid-level financial institution staff. This survey was administered as a follow-up to the “2014 financial institution staff questionnaire” administered in December 2014 (see Yamori and Yoneda (2015), Yamori (2016), etc.), and surveyed respondents’ attitudes towards their current workplaces and work experience, academic history and reasons for choosing employment by their institutions, sense of accomplishment in work and satisfaction with compensation/benefits, the strengths of the financial institutions in which they work, advice for companies and status of support measures, personnel systems and evaluation systems, issues they face in their workplace and workplace conditions, and more. The survey was administered to early- and mid-career financial institution staff in their 20s to 50s (excluding staff with positions of branch chief or higher). Responses were collected from 509 major commercial bank and trust bank staff, 294 regional bank staff, 66 second-tier regional bank staff, 143 credit association staff and 22 credit cooperative staff, for a total of 1034 respondents. In this paper we report the results of the survey related, in particular, to financial institution personnel management.

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  • Nobuyoshi Yamori & Koji Yoneda, 2017. "Current Situation and Challenges of Human Resources Management of Financial Institutions: Based on the 2017 Attitude Survey of Young and Mid-Level Staff of Japanese Financial Institutions," Discussion Paper Series DP2017-33, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University.
  • Handle: RePEc:kob:dpaper:dp2017-33

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    Regional revitalization; Region-based relationship banking; Regional finance; Personnel evaluation; Questionnaire;

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