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Reconstruction and development of rural Cambodia : from Krom Samakki to globalization


  • Amakawa, Naoko


This paper reveals how rural Cambodian people reconstructed their social relationships after the collapse of the Pol Pot regime by examining farmland, which was the most important means of production in rural areas at that time.Section 1 and 2 illustrate the process of returning from collective farming under the Pol Pot regime to the family farming system. Section 3 analyzes the structure of land ownership created through land distribution by Krom Samakki. Section 4 studies the actualities of tenant farming. Section 5 examines the changes of the land ownership structure during a decade years after the distribution of Krom Samakki. This paper concludes that the legacy of Krom Samakki started to fade as early as the 1990s.

Suggested Citation

  • Amakawa, Naoko, 2008. "Reconstruction and development of rural Cambodia : from Krom Samakki to globalization," IDE Discussion Papers 179, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
  • Handle: RePEc:jet:dpaper:dpaper179

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Norihiko Yamano & Bo Meng & Kiichiro Fukasaku, 2011. "Fragmentation and Changes in the Asian Trade Network," Working Papers PB-2011-01, Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia (ERIA).
    2. Robert Koopman & Zhi Wang & Shang-Jin Wei, 2008. "How Much of Chinese Exports is Really Made In China? Assessing Domestic Value-Added When Processing Trade is Pervasive," NBER Working Papers 14109, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Daisuke Hiratsuka & Yoko Uchida, 2010. "The Development of Input Trade and Production Networks in East Asia," Chapters,in: Input Trade and Production Networks in East Asia, chapter 1 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Kei-Mu Yi, 2003. "Can Vertical Specialization Explain the Growth of World Trade?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 111(1), pages 52-102, February.
    5. Hummels, David & Ishii, Jun & Yi, Kei-Mu, 2001. "The nature and growth of vertical specialization in world trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 75-96, June.
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    More about this item


    Cambodia; Reconstruction; Development; Land; カンボジア; 復興; 開発; 土地;

    JEL classification:

    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • R52 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis - - - Land Use and Other Regulations

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