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Then and Now: Reflections on Two Australian Mining Booms

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  • Gregory, Bob

    () (Australian National University)

Abstract

Australia is experiencing its largest mining boom for more than a century and a half. This paper explores, from a national perspective, important economic differences that arise when a mining boom, such as the current one, is generated by export price increases (trading gains) rather than export volume increases. Terms of trade changes - through their direct trading gain effect and indirect real GDP effect, primarily through increased employment levels - have increased Australian living standards. The increase, relative to the US, is about 25 per cent; an increase which probably places Australian living standards well above those of the US.

Suggested Citation

  • Gregory, Bob, 2011. "Then and Now: Reflections on Two Australian Mining Booms," IZA Discussion Papers 5969, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5969
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Peter Sheehan & Robert G. Gregory, 2013. "The Resources Boom and Economic Policy in the Long Run," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 46(2), pages 121-139, June.
    2. Rod Tyers, 2014. "Asymmetry in Boom-Bust Shocks: Australian Performance with Oligopoly," CAMA Working Papers 2014-50, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    resource booms; terms of trade; real GDP; economic growth;

    JEL classification:

    • Q33 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Resource Booms (Dutch Disease)
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • E01 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General - - - Measurement and Data on National Income and Product Accounts and Wealth; Environmental Accounts
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence
    • C43 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Index Numbers and Aggregation

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