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Can Gerhard Schröder Do It? Prospects for Fundamental Reform of the German Economy and a Return to High Employment


  • Collier, Irwin

    () (Free University of Berlin)


The year 2003 has witnessed several major reform policy initiatives in Germany intended to contribute to a solution to Germany's high unemployment problem and to improve the longrun sustainability of its social welfare policies. These economic reforms are discussed within a larger macroeconomic context.

Suggested Citation

  • Collier, Irwin, 2004. "Can Gerhard Schröder Do It? Prospects for Fundamental Reform of the German Economy and a Return to High Employment," IZA Discussion Papers 1059, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1059

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Layard, Richard & Nickell, Stephen & Jackman, Richard, 2005. "Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199279173, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lars Calmfors, 2004. "Activation versus Other Employment Policies - Lessons for Germany," CESifo Forum, Ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 5(2), pages 35-42, October.

    More about this item


    social policy reform; labor market reform; unemployment;

    JEL classification:

    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy
    • E65 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Studies of Particular Policy Episodes
    • O52 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Europe

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