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The Economic Impact of Fruit and Vegetable Production in Southwest Iowa Considering Local and Nearby Metropolitan Markets


  • Swenson, David A.


Rural producers are interested in developing income enhancing opportunities. Increased, in-season production of fresh fruits and vegetables fro local or regional consumption is one farm-level opportunity. This study looks at a 12 county region and evaluates the production-driven income gains that could be anticipated from increased local fruit and vegetable production of local consumption, as well as increased production to satisfy the demand of two major metropolitan markets that exist outside of the primary production region.

Suggested Citation

  • Swenson, David A., 2010. "The Economic Impact of Fruit and Vegetable Production in Southwest Iowa Considering Local and Nearby Metropolitan Markets," Staff General Research Papers Archive 13160, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:isu:genres:13160

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Karen Chapple & Ann Markusen & Greg Schrock & Daisaku Yamamoto & Pingkang Yu, 2004. "Rejoinder: High-Tech Rankings, Specialization, and Relationship to Growth," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 18(1), pages 44-49, February.
    2. Ronald C. Fisher, 1997. "Effects of state and local public services on economic development," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Mar, pages 53-82.
    3. Ellis, Stephen & Rogers, Cynthia, 2000. "Local Economic Development as a Prisoners' Dilemma: The Role of Business Climate," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 30(3), pages 315-330, Winter.
    4. Joseph Cortright & Heike Mayer, 2004. "Increasingly Rank: the Use and Misuse of Rankings in Economic Development," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 18(1), pages 34-39, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Brain, Roslynn & Curtis, Kynda & Hall, Kelsey, 2015. "Utah Farm-Chef-Fork: Building Sustainabile Local Food Connections," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 46(1), March.
    2. Jablonski, B.B.R. & Schmit, T.M., 2014. "‘Local’ Producers’ Production Functions and Their Importance in Estimating Economic Impacts," Working Papers 180117, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.

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