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The Economic Impact of Ethanol Production in Iowa


  • Swenson, David A.


Iowa is the center of an ethanol production boom in the Midwest. The overall impact of that expansion is substantial and quite discernible, especially among the many communities in which plants are locating. In the year 2000, about 180 million bushels of Iowa corn were processed into ethanol. By 2005 that amount had grown to more than 400 bushels million bushels – an expansion of 122 percent. Iowa’s processing capacity is now closing in on 800 million bushels of Iowa corn into ethanol. The industry is growing very rapidly. This report documents the job economic impact of ethanol industrial production for 2007.

Suggested Citation

  • Swenson, David A., 2008. "The Economic Impact of Ethanol Production in Iowa," Staff General Research Papers Archive 12865, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:isu:genres:12865

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    JEL classification:

    • H00 - Public Economics - - General - - - General

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