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Sentimental Preferences and the Organizational Regime of Betting Markets

Author

Listed:
  • Egon Franck

    () (Institute for Strategy and Business Economics, University of Zurich)

  • Erwin Verbeek

    () (Institute for Strategy and Business Economics, University of Zurich)

  • Stephan Nuesch

    () (Institute for Strategy and Business Economics, University of Zurich)

Abstract

We analyze the price impact of sentimental bettor preferences within a bookmaker betting market. Our model demonstrates that, under reasonable assumptions about the nature of demand in a market with strong competition, the bookmaker will offer lower prices for bets with comparatively stronger demand. Using a sample of more than 16,000 English soccer matches we find evidence that more favorable odds are extended to bets on more popular clubs and that this effect is amplified on weekends when sentimental bettors face lower opportunity costs to wager. Our findings help to explain why the market for sports gambling operates as a hybrid structure with bookmakers able to attract a considerable share of the betting volume although identical contracts are traded on exchange markets at lower costs; the organizational design of a quote-driven market enables the dealer to take advantage of sentimental bettor preferences.

Suggested Citation

  • Egon Franck & Erwin Verbeek & Stephan Nuesch, 2008. "Sentimental Preferences and the Organizational Regime of Betting Markets," Working Papers 0089, University of Zurich, Institute for Strategy and Business Economics (ISU), revised 2010.
  • Handle: RePEc:iso:wpaper:0089
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:eee:intfor:v:34:y:2018:i:1:p:17-29 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Babatunde Buraimo & David Peel & Rob Simmons, 2013. "Systematic Positive Expected Returns in the UK Fixed Odds Betting Market: An Analysis of the Fink Tank Predictions," International Journal of Financial Studies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 1(4), pages 1-15, December.
    3. Braun, Sebastian & Kvasnicka, Michael, 2013. "National Sentiment and Economic Behavior: Evidence From Online Betting on European Football," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 45-64.
    4. Arne Feddersen & Brad R. Humphreys & Brian P. Soebbing, 2017. "Sentiment Bias And Asset Prices: Evidence From Sports Betting Markets And Social Media," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(2), pages 1119-1129, April.
    5. Flepp, Raphael & Nüesch, Stephan & Franck, Egon, 2017. "The liquidity advantage of the quote-driven market: Evidence from the betting industry," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 306-317.
    6. Raphael Flepp & Stephan Nüesch & Egon Franck, 2013. " Liquidity, Market Efficiency and the Influence of Noise Traders: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from the Betting Industry," Working Papers 341, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    7. Bizzozero, Paolo & Flepp, Raphael & Franck, Egon, 2016. "The importance of suspense and surprise in entertainment demand: Evidence from Wimbledon," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 47-63.
    8. Franck, Egon & Verbeek, Erwin & Nüesch, Stephan, 2010. "Prediction accuracy of different market structures -- bookmakers versus a betting exchange," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, pages 448-459.
    9. Arne Feddersen & Brad Humphreys & Brian Soebbing, 2013. "Sentiment Bias in National Basketball Association Betting," Working Papers 13-03, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    10. Raphael Flepp & Stephan Nüesch & Egon Franck, 2016. "Does Bettor Sentiment Affect Bookmaker Pricing?," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 17(1), pages 3-11, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    betting; market structure; sentiment; price elasticity;

    JEL classification:

    • D11 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Theory
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • D21 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Theory
    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading

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