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Political Institutions and Street Protests in Latin America

Listed author(s):
  • Fabiana Machado
  • Carlos Scartascini
  • Mariano Tommasi

This paper argues that where institutions are strong, actors are more likely to participate in the political process through institutionalized arenas, while where they are weak, protests and other unconventional means of participation become more appealing. This relationship is explored empirically by combining country-level measures of institutional strength with individual-level information on protest participation in 17 Latin American countries. Evidence is found that weaker political institutions are associated with a higher propensity to use alternative means for expressing preferences, that is, to protest. Also found are interesting interactions between country-level institutional strength and some individual-level determinants of participation in protests.

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File URL: http://www.iadb.org/research/pub_hits.cfm?pub_id=IDB-WP-110&pub_file_name=pubIDB-WP-110.pdf
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Paper provided by Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department in its series Research Department Publications with number 4643.

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Date of creation: Nov 2009
Handle: RePEc:idb:wpaper:4643
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  1. Carlos Scartascini & Mariano Tommasi, 2009. "The Making of Policy: Institutionalized or Not?," Research Department Publications 4644, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  2. Daniel Diermeier & Michael Keane & Antonio Merlo, 2005. "A Political Economy Model of Congressional Careers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(1), pages 347-373, March.
  3. Carlos Scartascini & Mariano Tommasi, 2009. "The Making of Policy: Institutionalized or Not?," Research Department Publications 4644, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  4. Gingerich, Daniel W., 2009. "Corruption and Political Decay: Evidence from Bolivia," Quarterly Journal of Political Science, now publishers, vol. 4(1), pages 1-34, March.
  5. Pablo T. Spiller & Ernesto H. Stein & Mariano Tommasi & Carlos Scartascini & Lee J. Alston & Marcus André Melo & Bernardo Mueller & Carlos Pereira & Cristóbal Aninat & John Londregan & Patricio Navia , 2008. "Policymaking in Latin America: How Politics Shapes Policies," IDB Publications (Books), Inter-American Development Bank, number 40178 edited by Ernesto H. Stein & Mariano Tommasi & Pablo T. Spiller & Carlos Scartascini, February.
  6. repec:idb:idbbks:329 is not listed on IDEAS
  7. Jose Luis Evia & Roberto Laserna & Stergios Skaperdas, 2008. "Socio-Political Conflict and Eonomic Performance in Bolivia," Working Papers 070814, University of California-Irvine, Department of Economics.
  8. Jess Benhabib & Adam Przeworski, 2006. "The political economy of redistribution under democracy," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 29(2), pages 271-290, October.
  9. Adam Przeworski, 2005. "Democracy as an equilibrium," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 123(3), pages 253-273, June.
  10. Santiago Urbiztondo & Marcela Cristini & Cynthia Moskovits & Sebastián Saiegh, 2009. "The Political Economy of Productivity in Argentina: Interpretation and Illustration," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 1119, Inter-American Development Bank.
  11. Santiago Urbiztondo & Marcela Cristini & Cynthia Moskovits & Sebastián Saiegh, 2009. "The Political Economy of Productivity in Argentina: Interpretation and Illustration," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 5298, Inter-American Development Bank.
  12. Santiago Urbiztondo & Marcela Cristini & Cynthia Moskovitz & Sebastian Saiegh, 2009. "The Political Economy of Productivity in Argentina: Interpretation and Illustration," Research Department Publications 4641, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  13. repec:idb:brikps:40178 is not listed on IDEAS
  14. Huber, John D. & Kernell, Georgia & Leoni, Eduardo L., 2005. "Institutional Context, Cognitive Resources and Party Attachments Across Democracies," Political Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(04), pages 365-386, September.
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