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Information, Externalities and Socioeconomics of Malaria in Honduras: A Preliminary Analysis


  • Maria Victoria Aviles
  • Jose Cuesta


This paper explores how different levels of knowledge correlate with desirable preventive and curative practices against malaria in Honduras. The paper additionally analyzes “information externalities” associated with non-specific malaria health services, communicational campaigns and organized community networks. Using the 2004 ENSEMAH survey, the analysis tests for statistical differences in the means of behavioral variables and an index of household malaria knowledge, finding that the adoption of desirable prevention and treatment behaviors correlates with proficient levels of knowledge. Differences in behavior across groups with distinctive levels of proficiency were found statistically significant. Also, while information externalities exist, they nonetheless do not deliver adequate levels of knowledge proficiency to induce desirable anti-malaria behavior.

Suggested Citation

  • Maria Victoria Aviles & Jose Cuesta, 2009. "Information, Externalities and Socioeconomics of Malaria in Honduras: A Preliminary Analysis," Research Department Publications 4617, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:idb:wpaper:4617

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    Malaria; Information; Externalities; Honduras;

    JEL classification:

    • D19 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Other
    • H49 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Other
    • H75 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Government: Health, Education, and Welfare
    • I19 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Other

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