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Does Coordination of Welfare Services' Delivery Make a Difference for Extremely Disadvantaged Jobseekers? Evidence from the 'YP4' Trial

Author

Listed:
  • Jeff Borland

    (Department of Economics, The University of Melbourne)

  • Yi-Ping Tseng

    () (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne)

  • Roger Wilkins

    () (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne)

Abstract

Fragmented welfare service delivery has been identified as a significant barrier to improving outcomes for highly disadvantaged individuals. The ‘YP4’ trial, conducted from 2005 to 2009, sought to evaluate, by randomised control method, an approach proposed by Campbell et al. (2003) for integrating delivery of employment, housing, health and other services for young homeless jobseekers. Rather than providing extra access to services or utilisation of different services, the YP4 trial involved assignment of a case manager to help tailor and coordinate available services to reflect the specific circumstances of young homeless jobseekers. We find that the YP4 program did not have a significant effect on economic or psychological wellbeing, a finding that is robust to application of experimental and quasi-experimental methods. It is argued that our study contributes to knowledge on program design, particularly in relation to the importance of the scale of intervention and program administration.

Suggested Citation

  • Jeff Borland & Yi-Ping Tseng & Roger Wilkins, 2013. "Does Coordination of Welfare Services' Delivery Make a Difference for Extremely Disadvantaged Jobseekers? Evidence from the 'YP4' Trial," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2013n12, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  • Handle: RePEc:iae:iaewps:wp2013n12
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    File URL: http://melbourneinstitute.unimelb.edu.au/downloads/working_paper_series/wp2013n12.pdf
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    1. repec:exl:22evid:v:2014:y:2014:i:4:p:1-21 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Welfare programs; disadvantaged jobseekers; randomised controlled trials; program evaluation;

    JEL classification:

    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • J08 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics Policies
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • D04 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Policy: Formulation; Implementation; Evaluation

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