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Constitutional implementation of social choice correspondences


  • Bezalel Peleg


  • Hans Peters


  • Ton Storcken



A game form constitutionally implements a social choice correspondence if it implements it in Nash equilibrium and, moreover, the associated effectivity functions coincide. This paper presents necessary and sufficient conditions for a unanimous social choice correspondence to be constitutionally implementable, and sufficient and almost necessary conditions for an arbitrary (but surjective) social choice correspondence to be constitutionally implementable. It is shown that the results apply to interesting classes of scoring and veto rules.

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  • Bezalel Peleg & Hans Peters & Ton Storcken, 2003. "Constitutional implementation of social choice correspondences," Discussion Paper Series dp323, The Federmann Center for the Study of Rationality, the Hebrew University, Jerusalem.
  • Handle: RePEc:huj:dispap:dp323

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    social choice correspondence; game form; effectivity function; constitutional implementation;

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