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An Assessment of the Effects of Increased Regulatory Enforcement on Occupational Hearing Loss Workers' Compensation gon 1984-1998


  • Irwin B. Horwitz


  • Brian McCall



Hearing loss from occupational exposures has been found to be a common and serious problem affecting workers. This paper examines the effect that increasing legislative enforcement of existing regulations has on improving worker safety.

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  • Irwin B. Horwitz & Brian McCall, "undated". "An Assessment of the Effects of Increased Regulatory Enforcement on Occupational Hearing Loss Workers' Compensation gon 1984-1998," Working Papers 1402, Human Resources and Labor Studies, University of Minnesota (Twin Cities Campus).
  • Handle: RePEc:hrr:papers:1402

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    1. Duncan, Greg J & Stafford, Frank P, 1980. "Do Union Members Receive Compensating Wage Differentials?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 355-371, June.
    2. Craig A. Olson, 1981. "An Analysis of Wage Differentials Received by Workers on Dangerous Jobs," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 16(2), pages 167-185.
    3. Krueger, Alan B., 1990. "Incentive effects of workers' compensation insurance," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 73-99, February.
    4. Yong-Seung Park & Richard J. Butler, 2001. "The Safety Costs of Contingent Work: Evidence from Minnesota ," Journal of Labor Research, Transaction Publishers, vol. 22(4), pages 832-849, October.
    5. W. Kip Viscusi, 1979. "The Impact of Occupational Safety and Health Regulation," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 10(1), pages 117-140, Spring.
    6. Fairris, D., 1989. "Compensating Payments And Hazardous Work In Union And Nonunion Settings," Department of Economics Working Papers 134, Department of Economics, Williams College.
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