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Control and adaptation strategies for invasive species with different life history

Author

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  • Elofsson, Katarina

    () (Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)

  • Gren, Ing-Marie

    () (Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)

Abstract

The issue of timing and scope of policies to manage invasive species has achieved considerable attention in the economic literature. Whereas many earlier studies compare prevention and control for a single invading species, we focus instead on the optimal balance of adaptation and control when an invasive species competes for scarce resources with a resident species. In particular, we focus on the role that species’ life history, i.e. the degree of evolutionary specialization in survival or reproduction, plays for the choice of strategy. A numerical age-structured optimization model is used for the analysis. Results show that life history is an important factor for the trade-off between direct control of the invader and adaptation of harvesting strategies for the resident species. Life history is also crucial for the trade-off between early and delayed control of the invader. When a direct control technology is not available, there are larger economic losses with a resident species specialized in survival, whereas if such technologies are available, the larger losses occur with a resident species specialized in reproduction.

Suggested Citation

  • Elofsson, Katarina & Gren, Ing-Marie, 2013. "Control and adaptation strategies for invasive species with different life history," Working Paper Series 2013:4, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:slueko:2013_004
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    File URL: http://pub.epsilon.slu.se/9477/
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    Keywords

    Invasive species; life history; control; harvest; adaptation; costs;

    JEL classification:

    • D99 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Other
    • Q29 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Other
    • Q57 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Ecological Economics
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

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