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Trust in the Tropics? Experimental Evidence from Tanzania

Author

Listed:
  • Danielson, Anders

    (Department of Economics, Lund University)

  • Holm, Hakan J

    () (Department of Economics, Lund University)

Abstract

Undergraduates in Tanzania were exposed to one Trust game, one Dictator game and a standard set of survey questions relating to trust. We demonstrate that the survey questions neither predicts trust behavior nor trustworthiness as previously claimed by Glaeser et al. (2000). It is also shown that donation motives play an important part in the proportion returned by the second player in the Trust game and that survey answers are correlated to donations in the Dictator game. These aspects have often been neglected in previous research.

Suggested Citation

  • Danielson, Anders & Holm, Hakan J, 2002. "Trust in the Tropics? Experimental Evidence from Tanzania," Working Papers 2002:12, Lund University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:lunewp:2002_012
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Juan Camilo Cardenas & Jeffrey P. Carpenter, 2005. "Experiments and Economic Development: Lessons from Field Labs in the Developing World," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0505, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
    2. Juan Camilo Cardenas & Jeffrey Carpenter, 2008. "Behavioural Development Economics: Lessons from Field Labs in the Developing World," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(3), pages 311-338.
    3. Thomas Farole & Andres Rodriguez-Pose & Michael Storper, 2007. "Social capital, rules, and institutions: A cross-country investigation," Sciences Po publications 2007-12, Sciences Po.
    4. Joel Slemrod & Peter Katuák, 2005. "Do Trust and Trustworthiness Pay Off?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 40(3).
    5. Buchan, Nancy & Croson, Rachel, 2004. "The boundaries of trust: own and others' actions in the US and China," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 55(4), pages 485-504, December.
    6. Theresa Thompson Chaudhry & Misha Saleem, 2011. "Norms of Cooperation, Trust, Altruism, and Fairness: Evidence from Lab Experiments on Pakistani Students," Lahore Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics, vol. 16(Special E), pages 347-375, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Trust; trust game; social capital; altruism; experiments;

    JEL classification:

    • C78 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Bargaining Theory; Matching Theory
    • C90 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - General
    • D70 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - General

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