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Electoral accountability in a country with two-tiered government




In democracies, elections are the primary mechanism for making politicians act in voters’ interests, but voters are unable to prevent that some resources are diverted to political rents. With two levels of government, the rents are reduced if voters require higher beneficial public expenditures for reelecting incumbents. Voters can also strengthen their power by holding politicians liable also for decisions made by the other level of government. When the incumbent at one level acts as a Stackelberg leader with respect to the other, there is no risk of this leading to Leviathan policies on the part of the incumbents.

Suggested Citation

  • Granlund, David, 2010. "Electoral accountability in a country with two-tiered government," HUI Working Papers 30, HUI Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:huiwps:0030

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Göran Therborn & K.C. Ho, 2009. "Introduction," City, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(1), pages 53-62, March.
    2. Chengri Ding & Robert Simons & Esmail Baku, 2000. "The Effect of Residential Investment on Nearby Property Values: Evidence from Cleveland, Ohio," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 19(1), pages 23-48.
    3. Dennis Kaufman & Norman Cloutier, 2006. "The Impact of Small Brownfields and Greenspaces on Residential Property Values," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 19-30, August.
    4. Robert A. Simons & William Bowen & Arthur Sementell, 1997. "The Effect of Underground Storage Tanks on Residential Property Values in Cuyahoga County, Ohio," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 14(1), pages 29-42.
    5. Hank Jenkins-Smith & Carol Silva & Robert Berrens & Alok Bohara, 2002. "Information Disclosure Requirements and the Effect of Soil Contamination on Property Values," Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(3), pages 323-339.
    6. Robert A. Simons & Jesse D. Saginor, 2006. "A Meta-Analysis of the Effect of Environmental Contamination and Positive Amenities on Residential Real Estate Values," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 28(1), pages 71-104.
    7. J. Barkley Rosser, 2009. "Introduction," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research on Complexity, chapter 1 Edward Elgar Publishing.
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    More about this item


    Moral hazard; Separation of powers; Stackelberg; Transparency; Voting theory;

    JEL classification:

    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • H00 - Public Economics - - General - - - General
    • H77 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - Intergovernmental Relations; Federalism


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