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A Note on Confidence Intervals in Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Tambour, Magnus

    () (Dept. of Economics, Stockholm School of Economics)

  • Zethraeus, Niklas

    () (Dept. of Economics, Stockholm School of Economics)

  • Johannesson, Magnus

    () (Dept. of Economics, Stockholm School of Economics)

Abstract

How to obtain confidence intervals for cost-effectiveness ratios is complicated by the statistical problems to obtain a confidence interval for a ratio of random variables. Different approaches have been suggested in the literature, but no consensus has been reached. In this note we propose an alternative simple solution to this problem. By multiplying the effectiveness units by the price per effectiveness unit, both costs and benefits can be expressed in monetary terms and standard statistical techniques can be used to estimate a confidence interval for net benefits. This avoids the ratio estimation problem and explicitly recognizes that the price per effectiveness unit has to be known to provide cost-effectibeness analysis with a useful decision rule.

Suggested Citation

  • Tambour, Magnus & Zethraeus, Niklas & Johannesson, Magnus, 1997. "A Note on Confidence Intervals in Cost-Effectiveness Analysis," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 181, Stockholm School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:hastef:0181
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Joanne Lord & Maxwell A. Asante, 1999. "Estimating uncertainty ranges for costs by the bootstrap procedure combined with probabilistic sensitivity analysis," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(4), pages 323-333.
    2. Manca, A & Austin, P. C, 2008. "Using propensity score methods to analyse individual patient-level cost-effectiveness data from observational studies," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 08/20, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    3. Pedram Sendi, 2008. "Bridging the gap between health and non-health investments: moving from cost-effectiveness analysis to a return on investment approach across sectors of economy," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 8(2), pages 113-121, June.
    4. Gregory S. Zaric, 2008. "Optimal drug pricing, limited use conditions and stratified net benefits for Markov models of disease progression," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(11), pages 1277-1294.
    5. Joseph C. Gardiner & Marianne Huebner & James Jetton & Cathy J. Bradley, 2000. "Power and sample assessments for tests of hypotheses on cost-effectiveness ratios," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(3), pages 227-234.
    6. Niklas Zethraeus & Magnus Johannesson & Bengt Jönsson & Mickael Löthgren & Magnus Tambour, 2003. "Advantages of Using the Net-Benefit Approach for Analysing Uncertainty in Economic Evaluation Studies," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 21(1), pages 39-48, January.
    7. Mickael Löthgren & Niklas Zethraeus, 2000. "Definition, interpretation and calculation of cost-effectiveness acceptability curves," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(7), pages 623-630.
    8. Ya-Chen Shih & Nebiyou Bekele & Ying Xu, 2007. "Use of Bayesian Net Benefit Regression Model to Examine the Impact of Generic Drug Entry on the Cost Effectiveness of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Elderly Depressed Patients," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 25(10), pages 843-862, October.
    9. Jeffrey S. Hoch & Andrew H. Briggs & Andrew R. Willan, 2002. "Something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue: a framework for the marriage of health econometrics and cost-effectiveness analysis," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(5), pages 415-430.
    10. Joshua Graff Zivin, 2001. "Cost-effectiveness analysis with risk aversion," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(6), pages 499-508.
    11. Jeffrey Hoch & Carolyn Dewa, 2007. "Lessons from Trial-Based Cost-Effectiveness Analyses of Mental Health Interventions," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 25(10), pages 807-816, October.
    12. Andrew Willan, 2011. "Sample Size Determination for Cost-Effectiveness Trials," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 29(11), pages 933-949, November.
    13. Richard M. Nixon & David Wonderling & Richard D. Grieve, 2010. "Non-parametric methods for cost-effectiveness analysis: the central limit theorem and the bootstrap compared," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(3), pages 316-333.
    14. Eugene M. Laska & Morris Meisner & Carole Siegel & Aaron A. Stinnett, 1999. "Ratio-based and net benefit-based approaches to health care resource allocation: proofs of optimality and equivalence," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(2), pages 171-174.
    15. Martin Henriksson & Fredrik Lundgren & Per Carlsson, 2006. "Informing the efficient use of health care and health care research resources - the case of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm in Sweden," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(12), pages 1311-1322.
    16. Andrew H. Briggs, 1999. "A Bayesian approach to stochastic cost-effectiveness analysis," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(3), pages 257-261.
    17. Eugene M. Laska & Morris Meisner & Carole Siegel & Joseph Wanderling, 2002. "Statistical determination of cost-effectiveness frontier based on net health benefits," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(3), pages 249-264.
    18. Simon Eckermann & Andrew R. Willan, 2009. "Globally optimal trial design for local decision making," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(2), pages 203-216.
    19. Andrew R. Willan & Andrew H. Briggs & Jeffrey S. Hoch, 2004. "Regression methods for covariate adjustment and subgroup analysis for non-censored cost-effectiveness data," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(5), pages 461-475.
    20. Anthony O'Hagan & John W. Stevens, 2001. "A framework for cost-effectiveness analysis from clinical trial data," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(4), pages 303-315.
    21. Richard M. Nixon & Simon G. Thompson, 2005. "Methods for incorporating covariate adjustment, subgroup analysis and between-centre differences into cost-effectiveness evaluations," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(12), pages 1217-1229.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Confidence intervals; Cost-effectiveness ratios; Cost-effectiveness analysis; Economic evaluation;

    JEL classification:

    • D61 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Allocative Efficiency; Cost-Benefit Analysis
    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • H43 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Project Evaluation; Social Discount Rate
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General

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