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Family-Size Effects on Earnings – Definitions Matter

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  • Lampi, Elina

    () (Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, Göteborg University)

  • Nordblom, Katarina

    () (Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, Göteborg University)

Abstract

Number of siblings has previously been found to adversely affect earned income. However, we still lack understanding of whether nature or nurture drives this effect. We examine in detail the effects of having different kinds of siblings and find that the number of siblings one grew up with has a strong negative effect on earnings, while the total number of siblings as such has no significant effect. We also find that number of full-siblings has a strong effect irrespective of having grown up together. Hence, both nature and nurture play a role.

Suggested Citation

  • Lampi, Elina & Nordblom, Katarina, 2009. "Family-Size Effects on Earnings – Definitions Matter," Working Papers in Economics 364, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:gunwpe:0364
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/20312
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    family size; birth order; siblings; earnings; nature; nurture;

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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