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Diverging Accounts of Japanese Policymaking

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Abstract

In this paper different schools of Japanese policymaking are classified according to two variables: a) Defense/criticism of Japanese practices; and b) Number of actors. Then the common focal point of all such schools on the relevant actors and their relationships is reiterated and discussed. Finally, departing from Quansheng Zhao’s Japanese Policymaking: The Politics Behind Politics: Informal Mechanisms and the Making of China Policy (Oxford UP, 1995), culture and informal mechanisms in Japanese Foreign Policy are discussed. The paper is concluded by a few remarks about the connection between the concepts of policymaking and power, and the usefulness of cultural explanations.

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  • Hagström, Linus, 2001. "Diverging Accounts of Japanese Policymaking," EIJS Working Paper Series 102, Stockholm School of Economics, The European Institute of Japanese Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:eijswp:0102
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    1. George Baker & Robert Gibbons & Kevin J. Murphy, 1994. "Subjective Performance Measures in Optimal Incentive Contracts," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(4), pages 1125-1156.
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    3. Jones, Derek C & Kato, Takao, 1995. "The Productivity Effects of Employee Stock-Ownership Plans and Bonuses: Evidence from Japanese Panel Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(3), pages 391-414, June.
    4. Hashimoto, Masanori & Raisian, John, 1985. "Employment Tenure and Earnings Profiles in Japan and the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(4), pages 721-735, September.
    5. Ichniowski, Casey & Shaw, Kathryn & Prennushi, Giovanna, 1997. "The Effects of Human Resource Management Practices on Productivity: A Study of Steel Finishing Lines," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(3), pages 291-313, June.
    6. Peter AUER & Sandrine CAZES, 2000. "The resilience of the long-term employment relationship: Evidence from the industrialized countries," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 139(4), pages 379-408, December.
    7. Hashimoto, Mansanori, 1993. "Aspects of Labor Market Adjustments in Japan," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(1), pages 136-161, January.
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    Keywords

    Japanese policymaking; cultural mechanisms; informal mechanisms; power;

    JEL classification:

    • A00 - General Economics and Teaching - - General - - - General

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