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MIT's Openness to Jewish Economists

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  • E. Roy Weintraub

Abstract

MIT emerged from “nowhere” in the 1930s to its place as one of the three or four most important sites for economic research by the mid-1950s. A conference held at Duke University in April 2013 examined how this occurred. In this paper the author argues that the immediate postwar period saw a collapse – in some places slower, in some places faster – of the barriers to the hiring of Jewish faculty in American colleges and universities. And more than any other elite private or public university, particularly Ivy League universities, MIT welcomed Jewish economists.

Suggested Citation

  • E. Roy Weintraub, "undated". "MIT's Openness to Jewish Economists," Center for the History of Political Economy Working Paper Series 2013-05 4Creation-Date: 2, Center for the History of Political Economy.
  • Handle: RePEc:hec:heccee:2013-5
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    File URL: http://hope.econ.duke.edu/node/794
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    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Openness to talent
      by Nicholas Gruen in Club Troppo on 2013-11-08 12:38:21

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    Cited by:

    1. Klausinger, Hansjörg, 2013. "Academic Anti-Semitism and the Austrian School: Vienna, 1918-1945," Department of Economics Working Paper Series 3983, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    MIT; Jewish faculty; anti-Semitism; Samuelson;

    JEL classification:

    • B2 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925
    • B22 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Macroeconomics
    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • E12 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Keynes; Keynesian; Post-Keynesian
    • E13 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Neoclassical

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