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Measuring low work intensity – an analysis of the indicator

Author

Listed:
  • Terry Ward
  • Erhan Ozdemir

Abstract

This paper is a critical assessment of the indicator which has been developed to measure the relative number of people living in households with low, or very low, work intensity which is part of the Europe 2020 target set to reduce poverty and social exclusion in the European Union. It considers the way the indicator is defined and calculated, in particular, the age group taken to be of working-age, the treatment of students, the threshold defined to denote low work intensity and the extent of missing cases. It also examines how far the source of data used – the EU-SILC – correctly distinguishes those of working age who were not employed, or at least very little, over the year to which the indicator applies. It assesses, in addition, whether it is possible to use the Labour Force Survey (LFS) to estimate low household work intensity in advance of the EU-SILC data becoming available, given that that there is a lengthy delay between the year to which the EU-SILC relates and the publication of the data. It considers as well whether it is possible to estimate a measure of persistently low work intensity from the EU-SILC longitudinal data to complement the indicator and add a further level of detail relevant for policy. Finally, it assesses the reliability of the indicator from a statistical perspective by estimating the confidence intervals surrounding the point-estimates both for low work intensity in a particular year and for persistently low work intensity over a 4-year period.

Suggested Citation

  • Terry Ward & Erhan Ozdemir, 2013. "Measuring low work intensity – an analysis of the indicator," ImPRovE Working Papers 13/09, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
  • Handle: RePEc:hdl:improv:1309
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    File URL: http://www.centrumvoorsociaalbeleid.be/ImPRovE/Working%20Papers/ImPRovE%20WP%201309_1.pdf
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Anna B. Kis & András Gábos, 2015. "Consistent poverty across the EU," ImPRovE Working Papers 15/22, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
    2. Andrea Brandolini & Eliana Viviano, 2016. "Behind and beyond the (head count) employment rate," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 179(3), pages 657-681, June.
    3. Jeroen Horemans, 2016. "Polarisation of Non-standard Employment in Europe: Exploring a Missing Piece of the Inequality Puzzle," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 125(1), pages 171-189, January.
    4. Wim Van Lancker & Jeroen Horemans, 2017. "Into the Great Wide Unknown: Untangling the Relationship between Childcare Service Use and In-Work Poverty," Working Papers 1704, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
    5. Jeroen Horemans, 2016. "Polarisation of Non-standard Employment in Europe: Exploring a Missing Piece of the Inequality Puzzle," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 125(1), pages 171-189, January.
    6. Jeroen Horemans, 2017. "Atypical Employment and In-Work Poverty: A Different Story for Part-Timers and Temporary Workers?," Working Papers 1701, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Work intensity; workless households; poverty; social exclusion; Europe 2020; employment;

    JEL classification:

    • O52 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Europe
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

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