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Studying Governance and Public Management: Why? How?


  • Laurence E. Lynn, Jr.
  • Carolyn J. Heinrich
  • Carolyn J. Hill


How can public-sector regimes, agencies, programs, and activities be organized and managed to achieve public purposes? This general question is the concern of officials in all branches and at all levels of the public sector: legislators, elected and appointed executives, and judges at federal, state, and local levels of government. Underlying it is an even broader question: how can government continually improve performance so as to earn the respect of citizens who pay for and whose lives are affected by its program and regulatory activities? The fact that this question is of fundamental importance in politics, policy implementation, public administration, and public management motivates the systematic study of governance, that is, research whose objective is determining how, why, and with what consequences public-sector activity is structured and managed.

Suggested Citation

  • Laurence E. Lynn, Jr. & Carolyn J. Heinrich & Carolyn J. Hill, 1999. "Studying Governance and Public Management: Why? How?," Working Papers 9924, Harris School of Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago.
  • Handle: RePEc:har:wpaper:9924

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. Lucas, Robert E, Jr, 1978. "Asset Prices in an Exchange Economy," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(6), pages 1429-1445, November.
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    10. Per Krusell & Anthony A. Smith & Jr., 1998. "Income and Wealth Heterogeneity in the Macroeconomy," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(5), pages 867-896, October.
    11. Black, Fischer, 1986. " Noise," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 41(3), pages 529-543, July.
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