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Wages, prices, and living standards in China, 1738-1925: in comparison with Europe, Japan, and India

Author

Listed:
  • Robert C. Allen
  • Jean-Pascal Bassino
  • Debin Ma
  • Christine Moll-Murata
  • Jan Luiten van Zanden

Abstract

This article develops data on the history of wages and prices in Beijing, Canton, and Suzhou/Shanghai in China from the eighteenth century to the twentieth, and compares them with leading cities in Europe, Japan, and India in terms of nominal wages, the cost of living, and the standard of living. In the eighteenth century, the real income of building workers in Asia was similar to that of workers in the backward parts of Europe but far behind that in the leading economies in north-western Europe. Real wages stagnated in China in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries and rose slowly in the late nineteenth and early twentieth, with little cumulative change for 200 years. The income disparities of the early twentieth century were due to long-run stagnation in China combined with industrialization in Japan and Europe.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert C. Allen & Jean-Pascal Bassino & Debin Ma & Christine Moll-Murata & Jan Luiten van Zanden, 2011. "Wages, prices, and living standards in China, 1738-1925: in comparison with Europe, Japan, and India," Post-Print halshs-00647265, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-00647265
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00647265
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Feuerwerker, Albert, 1970. "Handicraft and Manufactured Cotton Textiles in China, 1871–1910," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 30(02), pages 338-378, June.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Wages; prices; living standards; China; Europe; Japan; India; early modern;

    JEL classification:

    • N0 - Economic History - - General

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