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An empirical study of environmental cost drivers


  • Simon Alcouffe

    () (ESC Toulouse - Ecole Supérieure de commerce de Toulouse)

  • Nicolas Berland

    () (DRM - Dauphine Recherches en Management - Université Paris-Dauphine - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Benjamin Dreveton

    () (CEREGE - CEntre de REcherche en GEstion - Université de Poitiers - Institut d'Administration des Entreprises (IAE) - Poitiers)

  • Moez Essid

    (GRIISG - ISG paris)


This paper draws on Environmental Management Accounting (EMA) literature and cost driver theory to study the nature and role of environmental cost drivers. More specifically, two types of operations related to environmental protection were empirically examined: the removal of asbestos from buildings and soil remediation. Findings from a series of case studies are presented and discussed. The paper contributes to existing literature in three ways: (1) by testing the adaptability of cost drivers typologies in a non-traditional, non-industrial setting (2) by proposing a more dynamic vision of the cost of social and environmental responsibility of the firm, and (3) by shedding light on the complex interrelationships of environmental cost drivers.

Suggested Citation

  • Simon Alcouffe & Nicolas Berland & Benjamin Dreveton & Moez Essid, 2010. "An empirical study of environmental cost drivers," Post-Print halshs-00530528, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-00530528
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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Cormier, Denis & Magnan, Michel, 2007. "The revisited contribution of environmental reporting to investors' valuation of a firm's earnings: An international perspective," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(3-4), pages 613-626, May.
    2. Herbohn, Kathleen, 2005. "A full cost environmental accounting experiment," Accounting, Organizations and Society, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 519-536, August.
    3. Satish Joshi & Ranjani Krishnan & Lester Lave, 2002. "Estimating the Hidden Costs of Environmental Regulation," Working Papers 02-10, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    4. Lehman, Glen, 1999. "Disclosing new worlds: a role for social and environmental accounting and auditing," Accounting, Organizations and Society, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 217-241, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Grégory Wegmann, 2011. "Activity-based Management in France: A focus on the information systems department of a bank," Post-Print hal-00584770, HAL.


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