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International Marine Bunkers: An Attempt to Assign its Usage to the Right Countries

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  • van Leeuwen, Nico
  • Robert McDougall

Abstract

In recent GTAP data releases, in transforming energy volumes data from the IEA extended energy balances to an input-output format, we record inflows into the energy balances flow "international marine bunkers" as exports, but record no corresponding imports. Here, we revise the energy module to balance the trade flows by recording international marine bunker usage as imports into the country of residence of the ship operator, and as usage by that country’s transport industry. We allocate usage across countries in proportion to the money value of their water transport services exports.

Suggested Citation

  • van Leeuwen, Nico & Robert McDougall, 2010. "International Marine Bunkers: An Attempt to Assign its Usage to the Right Countries," GTAP Research Memoranda 3445, Center for Global Trade Analysis, Department of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University.
  • Handle: RePEc:gta:resmem:3445 Note: GTAP Research Memorandum No. 20
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