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An Empirical Investigation of the Lucas Hypothesis: the Yield Curve and Non Linearity in the Money-Output Relationship

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  • Matteo Modena

Abstract

Existing evidence about the effectiveness of money growth to stimulate economic activity has been criticized from different perspectives. In addition, high correlation between money and output is not helpful to detect the direction of causality. From a policy perspective, in fact, positive correlation may arise from two opposite policy conducts: either the monetary authority sets the supply of money to influence future output fluctuations, or the central bank controls money growth as a reaction to the recent evolution of macro variables. In this work the relationship between money and output is analysed within a non linear framework that ascribes a primary role to expectations. In particular, we find evidence that the Lucas (1973) hypothesis, that exists an inverse correlation between the variance of nominal shocks and the magnitude of output response to nominal shocks, is supported by data evidence when the yield curve is either flat or downward sloping. We also provide evidence suggesting that the Friedman (1977) hypothesis, that the variability of inflation exerts a negative effect on the natural level of output, holds when a positive risk premium is incorporated in an upward sloping term structure of interest rates.

Suggested Citation

  • Matteo Modena, 2009. "An Empirical Investigation of the Lucas Hypothesis: the Yield Curve and Non Linearity in the Money-Output Relationship," Working Papers 2010_15, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow, revised Jun 2010.
  • Handle: RePEc:gla:glaewp:2010_15
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Term Structure; Kalman Filtering; Expectations; Output Growth.;

    JEL classification:

    • C01 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - General - - - Econometrics
    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates

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