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Effects of Social Security on Fertility and Saving: An Overlapping Generations Model

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  • L. K. Raut

Abstract

This paper studies the general equilibrium effects of various social security programs on the rates of population growth and capital accumulation within an overlapping generations framework with endogenous fertility and savings. It also shows that if the rate of intergenerational transfers of income from old to young or child care cost is low, a competitive equilibrium follows a path of over population and capital accumulation in a modified Pareto Optimal sense; a social security program in such a case is Pareto improving. A fully funded system is not neutral if it is financed by child - taxes. It also shows that unlike in the case of exogenous fertility where competitive equilibrium attains steady-state only asymptotically, when fertility is endogenous it may attain a unique globally stable steady state in finite time.
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Suggested Citation

  • L. K. Raut, "undated". "Effects of Social Security on Fertility and Saving: An Overlapping Generations Model," University of Chicago - Population Research Center 87-13, Chicago - Population Research Center.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:chiprc:87-13
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    Cited by:

    1. Lakshmi K Raut, 1997. "Learning to Perfect Manipulation: Implications for Fertility, Savings, and Old-Age Social Security," Working Papers 199704, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
    2. J. Ignacio Conde-Ruiz & Eduardo L. Giménez & Mikel Pérez-Nievas, 2010. "Millian Efficiency with Endogenous Fertility," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 77(1), pages 154-187.
    3. Stauvermann, Peter Josef & Kumar, Ronald, 2014. "Enhancing Growth and Welfare through debt-financed Education," MPRA Paper 59455, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Lakshmi K. Raut, 1996. "Subgame perfect manipulation of children by overlapping generations of agents with two-sided altruism and endogenous fertility," Labor and Demography 9604003, EconWPA.
    5. Stauvermann Peter, 1997. "Endogenes Wachstum, Fertilität und Sozialversicherung in Entwicklungsländern / Endogenous Growth, Fertility and Social Security," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 216(2), pages 175-193, April.
    6. Wei-bin Zhang, 2011. "Elastic Labour Supply and Home Production in a Monetary Growth Model," Interdisciplinary Description of Complex Systems - scientific journal, Croatian Interdisciplinary Society Provider Homepage: http://indecs.eu, vol. 9(2), pages 87-100.
    7. repec:eur:ejesjr:64 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Peter J. Stauvermann & Ronald R. Kumar, 2016. "Sustainability of A Pay-as-you-Go Pension System in A Small Open Economy with Ageing, Human Capital and Endogenous Fertility," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(1), pages 2-20, February.
    9. Stauvermann, Peter Josef & Kumar, Ronald, 2013. "Financing human capital development via government debt: a small country case using overlapping generations framework," MPRA Paper 47453, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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